Alcohol Linked to Several Types of Cancer — ASCO

Posted November 09, 2017

The American Society of Clinical Oncology, which represents numerous nation's top doctors, is warning people about the ties between drinking and cancer.

LoConte also told the Times people who do drink alcohol don't have to totally stop, although that'd be the smartest move, but that "If you want to reduce your cancer risk, drink less".

"The more you drink, the higher the risk", said Dr. Clifford A. Hudis, the chief executive of ASCO.

The new review of past studies on the link between alcohol and cancer, published Tuesday in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, found that approximately 3.5 percent of all cancer deaths in the USA can be attributed to alcohol consumption.

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The group warns that heavy drinkers have an increased risk of developing liver cancer, mouth cancer, throat cancer, colorectal cancers and cancer of the voicebox.

Many people may not recognize the link between alcohol and cancer, Ashton said, and thus may be missing out on an opportunity to lower cancer risk factors. Heavy drinkers who consume more than eight drinks a day have a 63 percent increased risk of female breast cancer because alcohol increases levels of the female sex hormone estrogen.

"ASCO believes that a proactive stance by the Society to minimize excessive exposure to alcohol has important implications for cancer prevention", the statement reads.

The doctors' group that published the statement hopes there's a new public push to downsize the advertising of alcohol to minors and even new taxes on booze.

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"With alcohol we are not saying don't drink ever". Oncologists have the ability to identify strategies to help patients reduce their alcohol intake; address racial, ethnic, gender, and sexual orientation disparities that may place these populations at increased cancer risk; and serve as community advisors and leaders to raise awareness of alcohol as a cancer risk behavior. "Therefore, limiting alcohol intake is a means to prevent cancer. Don't start.' This is a little more subtle". There's been a lot of talk touting certain alcohols, such as red wine, as cancer-fighting elixirs and superfoods - but these medical professionals reveal a bleak, risky reality of drinking.

"The evidence is very clear", she said.

Ashton said alcohol consumption has been shown to be a causative factor in a wide range of cancers, including cancer of the head and neck, esophagus, breast and colon.

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