Russia Used Video Game Screenshots to "Prove" the US Is Assisting ISIS

Posted November 15, 2017

The photographs were appended to social media posts from the ministry's official accounts posted on Tuesday morning, which accused the Americans of providing air cover for an Isis convoy with the aim of using Isis fighters to further United States interests.

Russia's Ministry of Defense ended up the target of derision after releasing an image it claimed to be "proof" that the U.S. military forces were working with supposed Islamic State soldiers. The images were from the game AC-130 Gunship Simulator, available for iOS and Android.

"I certainly can't verify but I have seen a report that one of the pictures came from a video game".

More news: Donald Trump feels insulted being called 'old' by Kim Jong Un

AFP was able to compare the images in the emailed defence ministry statement with the images of the videogame on YouTube and confirm the resemblance. None of the five photographs attached to the post were what the Russians claimed them to be, said online sleuths, with one photograph apparently a screenshot from the promo for a mobile phone game called AC-130 Gunship Simulator: Special Ops Squadron.

The original game footage, which was cropped in the ministry's post, included a red "FIRE" button in the bottom-right corner as well as a disclaimer in the top-right corner that read: "Development footage".

The tweet says that "the ministry of defence shows irrefutable evidence that USA are actually covering ISIS combat units to recover their combat capabilities, redeploy, and use them to promote American Interests in the Middle East". The statement wasn't even fully cropped out of the images that Russian Federation tweeted.

More news: Spot the MILLENNIUM FALCON with the Force of Google Maps!

Other images posted to Twitter appeared to be taken from videos released by Baghdad's Ministry of Defense in 2016, showing the Iraqi Air Force bombing jihadists near Fallujah, the CIT said.

The ministry said US-led coalition planes instead tried to impede Russian Aerospace Forces operations in the area.

The Russian military is investigating claims that a civilian employee attached the bogus images, state-run media reported later Tuesday.

More news: Musical.ly Sold for $1 Billion

"So again, that is pretty consistent with what we have seen come out of Russian MOD as being baseless, inaccurate and completely false".