United Nations appeals for $3 billion to save Yemen

Posted January 23, 2018

Saudi Arabia is expected to announce a multi-billion dollar aid package for Yemen, which it says will "alleviate the suffering" by opening land, sea and air routes into the war-torn country.

The coalition pledged funding of 40 million US dollars for the expansion of ports to accommodate additional humanitarian shipment, adding that it would set up an air corridor between Riyadh and the central Yemeni province of Marib to run multiple aid flights of C130 cargo planes.

The coalition pledged up to $40m for the expansion of ports to accommodate additional humanitarian shipments, adding that it would set up an air corridor between Riyadh and the central Yemeni province of Marib to run multiple aid flights of C130 cargo planes.

In 2017, donors provided US$1.65 billion (70.5 per cent) out of US$2.34 billion that humanitarian partners in Yemen requested.

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Saudi Arabia and its allies are facing mounting criticism - including from the United States - over the civilian toll in Yemen's conflict. The rebels, known Houthis, who are backed by Saudi rival, Iran, continue to control the capital, Sanaa, and territory in Yemen's north, which borders Saudi Arabia.

The body requested $2.96 billion for humanitarian aid to respond to an ever-broadening crisis in the country - where war, looming starvation and cholera have killed thousands.

The kingdom accuses rival Iran of providing Houthi militias with missile parts since it entered the Yemen civil war on the side of Yemeni President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi in March 2015.

The move will be seen as an attempt by Saudi Arabia's Crown Prince to reframe his country's image in the face of opposition. The Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights reported previous year that airstrikes remained the single largest cause of civilian casualties.

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The U.S.is also a major arms supplier to Saudi Arabia and other members of the coalition. Norway has suspended munitions exports to the United Arab Emirates based on its role in the Yemen conflict.

Another almost 2,200 Yemenis have died of cholera amid deteriorating hygiene and sanitation conditions, the World Health Organisation says. Some 380 cases of suspected diphtheria were also reported, causing at least 38 deaths, nearly all among children.

Germany will stop all arms exports to countries involved in the ongoing war in Yemen, a government spokesperson has announced.

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